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Weave A Wall Hanging

Use a loom to create a tactile wall hanging for your home. Chloe Medway shows us how with her helpful tutorial…

  • Weave A Wall Hanging
  • Weave A Wall Hanging
  • Weave A Wall Hanging
  • Weave A Wall Hanging
You'll Need
    • Weaving loom, large
    • Wool, aran-weight, cream, 75g, black, 15g, turquoise, 25g
    • Roving, pink, 50g, cream, 25g
    • Cotton rope string, 50g
    • Shuttle
    • Wide tooth comb
    • Wooden dowel, 9mm x 35cm
    • Tapestry needle with large eye
    • Scissors
Creating The Warp

    Using a thin strong cotton rope, and starting at the top, wind the thread under and over the first four teeth on the loom and tie the loose end securely in place. Carry the string to the bottom of the warp bar, passing it through the deep groove on the middle section. This bar is called the shed. Holding the string firmly, wind it under the fourth tooth at the bottom of the loom and then back up to the top of the loom, working across from left to right. Once you’ve reached the fifth tooth from the end work backwards, this time passing the thread through the shallow groove in the shed until you end up back at the beginning. Tie the loose end securely, making sure the warp isn’t too loose or too strained.

Weaving The Weft

    Take your wool and wrap it around the wooden shuttle several times (about 3m will create approximately 2.5cm of weaving). The shed will create a gap wide enough to pass the shuttle and wool through the middle of the warp threads to the other side. Leaving a few inches of wool hanging loose at the start, use the wide-toothed comb to push the wool neatly to the bottom of the loom. This is the weft. Change the direction of the shed, this time holding it downwards and make the return journey with the shuttle through the warp. Once at other side, pull the wool through so that there is a neat loop at the edge and it doesn’t pull or misshape the warp. Push down with the comb so there are no gaps between each row. Repeat this process back and forth until you are ready to change colours or the wool on the shuttle runs out.

Changing Colours

    Once you have come to the end of a colour make sure you leave a few inches of thread hanging loose at the back. Reload the shuttle with either the same or new colour, again leaving a loose end. When the weaving is finished, these ends can be secured by tying them together or threading through and trimming.

Making Tassels

    Once you have come to the end of a colour make sure you leave a few inches of thread hanging loose at the back. Reload the shuttle with either the same or new colour, again leaving a loose end. When the weaving is finished, these ends can be secured by tying them together or threading through and trimming.

Add Texture With Roving

    Pull apart a length of roving (unspun wool) and weave in the same way as the yarn, but also gently pull it through from the front to create either uniform or irregular “bubbles”. You will need nearly twice as much roving for one length of weft compared to wool. Weave in the ends at the back to secure.

Creating Shapes

    For the turquoise pyramid begin seven warp strings in, work back and forth four times before beginning the next tier, this time starting 11 strings in and so on. Once complete, continue to weave the original colour around the shape, feeding the shuttle behind and then back through the front once clear of the triangle.

Finishing The Weave

    When you have reached the desired size, take the end loop from the top of the loom and cut. Tie the two ends together in a knot firmly so it will hold the weft snugly in place, continue one by one until the top is free from the loom. Turn the weaving over and thread the loose warp threads through and under the back using a tapestry needle. Tidy up any other ends in a similar way and trim if necessary. Pull the weave off the end tooth at the bottom of the loom to create a pair of loops. Create a tassel as per step four, this time threading the grouped ends under the weft loop and bringing them through the middle and back through itself to create a Rya knot. Continue pulling pairs of loops off the loom and securing them with tassels until complete.

Hanging The Weave

    Stitch the top of the weaving to the dowel with twine through each knotted strand, working up and over along the dowel and knot at the end. Take about 40cm more of the twine and attach to the dowel with a loop knot at either end. Hang, and trim tassels to the desired length.

Weave A Wall Hanging

Use a loom to create a tactile wall hanging for your home. Chloe Medway shows us how with her helpful tutorial…

You'll Need
    • Weaving loom, large
    • Wool, aran-weight, cream, 75g, black, 15g, turquoise, 25g
    • Roving, pink, 50g, cream, 25g
    • Cotton rope string, 50g
    • Shuttle
    • Wide tooth comb
    • Wooden dowel, 9mm x 35cm
    • Tapestry needle with large eye
    • Scissors
Creating The Warp

    Using a thin strong cotton rope, and starting at the top, wind the thread under and over the first four teeth on the loom and tie the loose end securely in place. Carry the string to the bottom of the warp bar, passing it through the deep groove on the middle section. This bar is called the shed. Holding the string firmly, wind it under the fourth tooth at the bottom of the loom and then back up to the top of the loom, working across from left to right. Once you’ve reached the fifth tooth from the end work backwards, this time passing the thread through the shallow groove in the shed until you end up back at the beginning. Tie the loose end securely, making sure the warp isn’t too loose or too strained.

Weaving The Weft

    Take your wool and wrap it around the wooden shuttle several times (about 3m will create approximately 2.5cm of weaving). The shed will create a gap wide enough to pass the shuttle and wool through the middle of the warp threads to the other side. Leaving a few inches of wool hanging loose at the start, use the wide-toothed comb to push the wool neatly to the bottom of the loom. This is the weft. Change the direction of the shed, this time holding it downwards and make the return journey with the shuttle through the warp. Once at other side, pull the wool through so that there is a neat loop at the edge and it doesn’t pull or misshape the warp. Push down with the comb so there are no gaps between each row. Repeat this process back and forth until you are ready to change colours or the wool on the shuttle runs out.

Changing Colours

    Once you have come to the end of a colour make sure you leave a few inches of thread hanging loose at the back. Reload the shuttle with either the same or new colour, again leaving a loose end. When the weaving is finished, these ends can be secured by tying them together or threading through and trimming.

Making Tassels

    Once you have come to the end of a colour make sure you leave a few inches of thread hanging loose at the back. Reload the shuttle with either the same or new colour, again leaving a loose end. When the weaving is finished, these ends can be secured by tying them together or threading through and trimming.

Add Texture With Roving

    Pull apart a length of roving (unspun wool) and weave in the same way as the yarn, but also gently pull it through from the front to create either uniform or irregular “bubbles”. You will need nearly twice as much roving for one length of weft compared to wool. Weave in the ends at the back to secure.

Creating Shapes

    For the turquoise pyramid begin seven warp strings in, work back and forth four times before beginning the next tier, this time starting 11 strings in and so on. Once complete, continue to weave the original colour around the shape, feeding the shuttle behind and then back through the front once clear of the triangle.

Finishing The Weave

    When you have reached the desired size, take the end loop from the top of the loom and cut. Tie the two ends together in a knot firmly so it will hold the weft snugly in place, continue one by one until the top is free from the loom. Turn the weaving over and thread the loose warp threads through and under the back using a tapestry needle. Tidy up any other ends in a similar way and trim if necessary. Pull the weave off the end tooth at the bottom of the loom to create a pair of loops. Create a tassel as per step four, this time threading the grouped ends under the weft loop and bringing them through the middle and back through itself to create a Rya knot. Continue pulling pairs of loops off the loom and securing them with tassels until complete.

Hanging The Weave

    Stitch the top of the weaving to the dowel with twine through each knotted strand, working up and over along the dowel and knot at the end. Take about 40cm more of the twine and attach to the dowel with a loop knot at either end. Hang, and trim tassels to the desired length.