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Reupholster a dining chair

Try upholstery in its simplest form and update your dining chairs

  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
  • Reupholster a dining chair
    • Dining chair
    • Rust-Oleum ‘Painters Touch’ all purpos paint – White Gloss finish and Primer
    • Clarke and Clarke fabric - Ika Sorbet F0495/03
    • Staple gun
    • Lining fabric
    • Hammer
    • Plier

    Try upholstery in its simplest form and update your dining chairs

    1. First prepare the frame of your chair; remove the seat (keep the screws safe) from the chair and take off the old fabric. This chair had a foam pad underneath the fabric which was still in good condition. If the foam or wadding is worn you will need to replace it for new. If the chair has never been painted before it is recommended that a primer is used first. Wash and lightly sand the surface then apply the primer, leave to dry over night, then apply the top colour. Again leave for 24 hours.

    2. If the foam needs replacing, trim the new foam to size by first drawing around the seat, then cut the foam with a ruler and bread knife or a pair of scissors. Place a piece of wadding in the centre of the drop in seat, then lay the foam on top; this will give the seat a slightly domed look of traditional upholstery.

    3. Cut a piece of lining fabric 15cm larger than the seat. Centre the lining over the foam and around onto the underside of the seat, then stretch and position a staple in the centre of each side. Continue stretching and stapling down each of the sides. Keep checking the front of the seat to make sure that your stapling is forming even rounded edges.

    4. You should be left with excess fabric at each corner; pick up the corner of the lining and pull this in towards the centre, across the corner of the frame and staple in place. Evenly stretch and pleat the remainder of the excess fabric either side of the centre staple. Don’t worry if you staple in the wrong position, the staples are easily lifted with a staple remover or a flat screw driver and pliers. It is quite important that you achieve a good shape at this stage as it sets the fit for the top fabric.

    5. Centre the top fabric over the prepared seat, stretch and position a staple in the centre of each side, then pull the fabric round onto the wooden base of the frame. Continue stretching and stapling down each of the sides repeating the process as done for the lining. Trim any excess fabric and lining from the back of the seat, removing from the corners to reduce the bulk.

    6. Cut a piece of lining the same shape and dimensions as the seat frame, turn and press in 1cm around each edge. Place the lining on the base of the seat, then staple in place. This is just to tidy the base so you don’t need so many staples just enough to hold it in place. Finally re-screw the upholstered seat onto the chair. You may need to find the screw holes; a bradawl or pointed nail is handy for this.

Reupholster a dining chair

Try upholstery in its simplest form and update your dining chairs

    • Dining chair
    • Rust-Oleum ‘Painters Touch’ all purpos paint – White Gloss finish and Primer
    • Clarke and Clarke fabric - Ika Sorbet F0495/03
    • Staple gun
    • Lining fabric
    • Hammer
    • Plier

    Try upholstery in its simplest form and update your dining chairs

    1. First prepare the frame of your chair; remove the seat (keep the screws safe) from the chair and take off the old fabric. This chair had a foam pad underneath the fabric which was still in good condition. If the foam or wadding is worn you will need to replace it for new. If the chair has never been painted before it is recommended that a primer is used first. Wash and lightly sand the surface then apply the primer, leave to dry over night, then apply the top colour. Again leave for 24 hours.

    2. If the foam needs replacing, trim the new foam to size by first drawing around the seat, then cut the foam with a ruler and bread knife or a pair of scissors. Place a piece of wadding in the centre of the drop in seat, then lay the foam on top; this will give the seat a slightly domed look of traditional upholstery.

    3. Cut a piece of lining fabric 15cm larger than the seat. Centre the lining over the foam and around onto the underside of the seat, then stretch and position a staple in the centre of each side. Continue stretching and stapling down each of the sides. Keep checking the front of the seat to make sure that your stapling is forming even rounded edges.

    4. You should be left with excess fabric at each corner; pick up the corner of the lining and pull this in towards the centre, across the corner of the frame and staple in place. Evenly stretch and pleat the remainder of the excess fabric either side of the centre staple. Don’t worry if you staple in the wrong position, the staples are easily lifted with a staple remover or a flat screw driver and pliers. It is quite important that you achieve a good shape at this stage as it sets the fit for the top fabric.

    5. Centre the top fabric over the prepared seat, stretch and position a staple in the centre of each side, then pull the fabric round onto the wooden base of the frame. Continue stretching and stapling down each of the sides repeating the process as done for the lining. Trim any excess fabric and lining from the back of the seat, removing from the corners to reduce the bulk.

    6. Cut a piece of lining the same shape and dimensions as the seat frame, turn and press in 1cm around each edge. Place the lining on the base of the seat, then staple in place. This is just to tidy the base so you don’t need so many staples just enough to hold it in place. Finally re-screw the upholstered seat onto the chair. You may need to find the screw holes; a bradawl or pointed nail is handy for this.