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Recipe: Eric Lanlard’s Pain Au Chocolat

If you’ve got your hands on a copy of the latest issue of Homemaker and flick to page 71, you’ll see how to whip up a Cake Boy breakfast favourite, pain au chocolat. Here’s the step-by-step you need in order to make the dough for the pastries. “This recipe requires you to wake up earlier than you usually would to make them, but it’s worth it, especially for a weekend treat,” says Eric. Taken from his book, Chocolat, visit his site to see more mouth-wateringly amazing treats to feast your eyes on!

  • Recipe: Eric Lanlard’s Pain Au Chocolat
    To make 6, you'll need:
      • 250ml warm milk
      • 1 tsp dried yeast
      • 165g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing
      • 40g golden caster sugar
      • 1 tsp salt
      • 450g plain flour, sifted, plus extra for dusting
      • 200g dark chocolate bar, broken into 12 strips
      • 1 egg, beaten
      1. Put the milk, yeast, 15g of the butter, the sugar and salt into the bowl of a freestanding mixer fitted with a dough hook, then mix well. Gradually add the flour, mixing until the dough comes away from the side of the bowl. Place the dough in a lightly floured bowl and cover with clingfilm or a damp tea towel. Leave to rise for 40 minutes at room temperature, or until the dough has almost doubled in volume.
      2. Using a rolling pin, lightly beat the remaining butter between two sheets of greaseproof paper to a 12cm x 20cm rectangle and chill.
      3. When the dough has risen, knock it back to release the air, then turn it out onto a floured surface. Roll out the dough to 20cm x 40cm. Remove the butter from the greaseproof paper and place in the centre of the dough. Fold the dough over the butter like an envelope, making sure none of the butter is exposed.
      4. Roll out the dough to an even 20cm x 50cm rectangle. Fold in thirds lengthways, like a business letter. This completes the first turn. Rotate by 90° so that the folded edge is on your left and the dough faces you like a book. Roll out again to a neat rectangle, 20cm x 50cm, and repeat the folding process. This completes the second turn. Cover with clingfilm and chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Repeat the process so that you end up with four turns in total, then chill for a further 30 minutes.
      5. Roll out the dough on a floured surface to a 5mm thick, 20cm x 60cm, then cut into 6 strips, 10cm x 20cm. Place two strips of chocolate across the shorter length of a dough strip and roll up, enclosing the chocolate. Repeat with the remaining chocolate and dough strips. Place seam side down on a greased baking sheet and flatten them gently with your hand. Cover with clingfilm and leave to rise at room temperature for 35−40 minutes.
      6. Preheat the oven to 180°C (fan 160°C). Brush the pastries with the beaten egg and bake in the oven for 25–30 minutes, or until golden brown. Leave to cool before serving.
    Recipe: Eric Lanlard’s Pain Au Chocolat

    If you’ve got your hands on a copy of the latest issue of Homemaker and flick to page 71, you’ll see how to whip up a Cake Boy breakfast favourite, pain au chocolat. Here’s the step-by-step you need in order to make the dough for the pastries. “This recipe requires you to wake up earlier than you usually would to make them, but it’s worth it, especially for a weekend treat,” says Eric. Taken from his book, Chocolat, visit his site to see more mouth-wateringly amazing treats to feast your eyes on!

    To make 6, you'll need:
      • 250ml warm milk
      • 1 tsp dried yeast
      • 165g unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing
      • 40g golden caster sugar
      • 1 tsp salt
      • 450g plain flour, sifted, plus extra for dusting
      • 200g dark chocolate bar, broken into 12 strips
      • 1 egg, beaten
      1. Put the milk, yeast, 15g of the butter, the sugar and salt into the bowl of a freestanding mixer fitted with a dough hook, then mix well. Gradually add the flour, mixing until the dough comes away from the side of the bowl. Place the dough in a lightly floured bowl and cover with clingfilm or a damp tea towel. Leave to rise for 40 minutes at room temperature, or until the dough has almost doubled in volume.
      2. Using a rolling pin, lightly beat the remaining butter between two sheets of greaseproof paper to a 12cm x 20cm rectangle and chill.
      3. When the dough has risen, knock it back to release the air, then turn it out onto a floured surface. Roll out the dough to 20cm x 40cm. Remove the butter from the greaseproof paper and place in the centre of the dough. Fold the dough over the butter like an envelope, making sure none of the butter is exposed.
      4. Roll out the dough to an even 20cm x 50cm rectangle. Fold in thirds lengthways, like a business letter. This completes the first turn. Rotate by 90° so that the folded edge is on your left and the dough faces you like a book. Roll out again to a neat rectangle, 20cm x 50cm, and repeat the folding process. This completes the second turn. Cover with clingfilm and chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Repeat the process so that you end up with four turns in total, then chill for a further 30 minutes.
      5. Roll out the dough on a floured surface to a 5mm thick, 20cm x 60cm, then cut into 6 strips, 10cm x 20cm. Place two strips of chocolate across the shorter length of a dough strip and roll up, enclosing the chocolate. Repeat with the remaining chocolate and dough strips. Place seam side down on a greased baking sheet and flatten them gently with your hand. Cover with clingfilm and leave to rise at room temperature for 35−40 minutes.
      6. Preheat the oven to 180°C (fan 160°C). Brush the pastries with the beaten egg and bake in the oven for 25–30 minutes, or until golden brown. Leave to cool before serving.