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Bonus Project – Marmalade On Toast Ice Cream

This fine day we bring to you the crème de la crème of ice cream recipes, with a lovely extract from Homemaker favourite Claire Kelsey. In our latest issue out on June 7, she gives us some to-die-for ice cream recipes from her new book Melt (£18.99, Simon & Schuster UK Ltd), but in the meantime here’s a sneaky little treat from Claire for you to feast your eyes (and subsequently your mouth) on. Enjoy!

  • Bonus Project – Marmalade On Toast Ice Cream
      • 100 g/3½ oz wholemeal bread
      • 70 g/2½ oz/scant 1 ⁄3 cup soft dark brown sugar
      • 2 large egg whites
      • 1 tbsp icing sugar
      • 400 g/14 oz Seville orange marmalade
      • 350 ml/12 fl oz/1½ cups double cream
    Marmalade on Toast

      This is a good morning ice cream. Many Sicilians eat their gelato for breakfast, stuffed into big, pillowy white bread rolls. I don’t know why, but you can justify anything culinary if you can say the Italians do it. If you like, you can omit the toasted crumbs from the recipe and spoon the marmalade ice cream onto thick, buttered wholemeal toast.

      The ice cream isn’t churned. Instead, air is incorporated into the cream and meringue, so that the toast crumbs keep their bite. This flavour won the ‘Best Dessert’ at the British Street Food Awards 2012, where Ginger’s also scooped (pun intended) the ‘Best of the Best’ award.

      1. Heat the oven to 170ºC/325ºF/Gas mark 3. Then process the bread to make breadcrumbs. You want them quite coarse, so stop when they resemble rubble.
      2. Spread the crumbs onto a baking tray and mix in the sugar. Bake for about 15 minutes until they are dry and crisp. Leave them to cool.
      3. To make the meringue, whisk the egg whites in a scrupulously clean bowl. When they start to form soft peaks, add the icing sugar and continue to whisk for another minute until they turn glossy. Stop before the meringue becomes stiff.
      4. Mix the marmalade into the double cream, then whisk the mixture into soft peaks. Again, stop before it becomes too firm, otherwise you won’t be able to fold your mixtures together.
      5. Fold together the meringue and marmalade cream. Use your largest bowl and a spatula, or a very big spoon. First, add a little of the meringue to the marmalade and cream, then add the rest into the bowl using a folding motion, turning the bowl as you go. The idea is to retain as much air as possible in the mix.
      6. Scatter the crumbs over the top and repeat the folding and turning, mixing the crumbs evenly through the cream. Put the mixture in a tub, cover, and freeze overnight. This is easily scoopable almost straight from the freezer.
    Bonus Project – Marmalade On Toast Ice Cream

    This fine day we bring to you the crème de la crème of ice cream recipes, with a lovely extract from Homemaker favourite Claire Kelsey. In our latest issue out on June 7, she gives us some to-die-for ice cream recipes from her new book Melt (£18.99, Simon & Schuster UK Ltd), but in the meantime here’s a sneaky little treat from Claire for you to feast your eyes (and subsequently your mouth) on. Enjoy!

      • 100 g/3½ oz wholemeal bread
      • 70 g/2½ oz/scant 1 ⁄3 cup soft dark brown sugar
      • 2 large egg whites
      • 1 tbsp icing sugar
      • 400 g/14 oz Seville orange marmalade
      • 350 ml/12 fl oz/1½ cups double cream
    Marmalade on Toast

      This is a good morning ice cream. Many Sicilians eat their gelato for breakfast, stuffed into big, pillowy white bread rolls. I don’t know why, but you can justify anything culinary if you can say the Italians do it. If you like, you can omit the toasted crumbs from the recipe and spoon the marmalade ice cream onto thick, buttered wholemeal toast.

      The ice cream isn’t churned. Instead, air is incorporated into the cream and meringue, so that the toast crumbs keep their bite. This flavour won the ‘Best Dessert’ at the British Street Food Awards 2012, where Ginger’s also scooped (pun intended) the ‘Best of the Best’ award.

      1. Heat the oven to 170ºC/325ºF/Gas mark 3. Then process the bread to make breadcrumbs. You want them quite coarse, so stop when they resemble rubble.
      2. Spread the crumbs onto a baking tray and mix in the sugar. Bake for about 15 minutes until they are dry and crisp. Leave them to cool.
      3. To make the meringue, whisk the egg whites in a scrupulously clean bowl. When they start to form soft peaks, add the icing sugar and continue to whisk for another minute until they turn glossy. Stop before the meringue becomes stiff.
      4. Mix the marmalade into the double cream, then whisk the mixture into soft peaks. Again, stop before it becomes too firm, otherwise you won’t be able to fold your mixtures together.
      5. Fold together the meringue and marmalade cream. Use your largest bowl and a spatula, or a very big spoon. First, add a little of the meringue to the marmalade and cream, then add the rest into the bowl using a folding motion, turning the bowl as you go. The idea is to retain as much air as possible in the mix.
      6. Scatter the crumbs over the top and repeat the folding and turning, mixing the crumbs evenly through the cream. Put the mixture in a tub, cover, and freeze overnight. This is easily scoopable almost straight from the freezer.